35 Things you probably didn't know about Lexington
March 20, 2017 | Chad Smith
1. The Jif peanut butter plant in Lexington produces more peanut butter than any other factory on earth. 35 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About LexingtonSource: Flickr user JeepersMedia
2. There are two plaques in Lexington honoring Smiley Pete, the town dog who died in 1967. 3. According to the law books, it’s illegal to carry an ice cream cone in your back pocket when in Lexington. Though we’re not sure why you’d want to? 
35 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About LexingtonSource: Flickr user Michael Bentley
4. The high calcium content in the inner soils of the Bluegrass Region, where Lexington is located, leads to stronger bones and greater durability in horses. It’s no wonder that the city is known as a prime place to breed Thoroughbred horses. 5. Not only does Lexington breed horses, it also flies them. The city is home to the H.E. “Tex” Sutton Forwarding Company, which transports horses by air. 35 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About LexingtonSource: H.E. "Tex" Sutton Forwarding Company, LLC via Facebook
6. Lexington’s Kentucky Wildcats men’s basketball team was the first team in college basketball history to claim 2,000 wins. 7. Lexington civic leader John Wesley Hunt became the first millionaire west of the Alleghenies. 8. In Lexington, 4th of July festivities don’t only last for one day–the celebration is carried out over several days. 9. Lexington was the first city to launch a reenactment of Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” video.  35 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About LexingtonSource: Flickr user Trinibambini
10. Nathan Burrows, one of the first settlers of Lexington, produced a new variety of mustard, named Lexington Mustard after the town. The product was sold throughout the country. 11. Lexington has been named one of the world’s cleanest cities by Forbes. 12. Stud and actor extraordinaire George Clooney was born in Lexington. 35 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About LexingtonSource: Michael Vlasaty via Wikimedia Commons
13. In the 1800s, Lexington had become so large, cultured and wealthy that the city earned the nickname “Athens of the West.” 14. Lexington hosts The Festival of The Bluegrass, which is Kentucky’s oldest bluegrass music festival.  35 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About LexingtonSource: Facebook user Festival of Bluegrass
15. Dr. Thomas Hunt Morgan of Lexington received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1933 for his work in genetics. 16. However, despite Morgan’s great achievement, the Lexington paper simply read, “Nephew of John Hunt Morgan wins Nobel Prize.” 17. The first American performance of a Beethoven symphony was in Lexington in 1817. 18. Lexington is named one of the top college towns in the U.S. by Livability.  35 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About LexingtonSource: Facebook user University of Kentucky
19. Lexington was given its name after settlers heard of the colonists’ victory in the Battles of Lexington and Concord. Lexington would be the first of many U.S. cities to be named after the Massachusetts town. 20. Many of America’s most important people of the 19th century spent part of their lives in Lexington, including, Abraham Lincoln, Confederate President Jefferson Davis, and Vice President John C. Breckinridge. 21. Not only is the University of Kentucky Art Museum the premier art museum of Lexington, it’s also the only accredited museum in the region and houses over 4,000 objects. 22. The Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill in Lexington is the largest restored Shaker community in the US. 23. When founded, a risk of Indian attacks delayed the permanent settlement of Lexington for four years. 24. The Arboretum, State Botanical Garden of Kentucky in Lexington features over 50 different native grasses and more than 1,500 species of roses.  35 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About LexingtonSource: Flickr user Loufi
25. Lexington’s First African Baptist church is the oldest African-American Baptist church in Kentucky and the third oldest in the US. 26. Lexington was founded in 1775 and chartered in 1782, even though Kentucky didn’t become a state until 1792. 27. The annual Kentucky Crawfish Festival in Lexington ships an entire truckload of crawfish from Louisiana just for the event. 35 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About LexingtonSource: Flickr user DR Ranch
28. Until 1793, Lexington served as the temporary capital of Kentucky. 29. Lexington is said to have one of the most stable economies in the country. In 2008, the city had an unemployment rate of only 5.4%. 30. The Rupp Arena in Lexington is one of the largest basketball arenas in the country.35 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About LexingtonSource: Flickr user Sonnett
31. The Lexington Public Library boasts the world’s largest ceiling clock. 32. The Federal Medical Center, Lexington, now a prison, was once one of the first drug rehabilitation clinics in the nation, the Addiction Research Center. 33. American novelist and short story writer James Lane Allen, known for his depictions of Kentucky, grew up in Lexington. 34. Marry Todd, who later became the wife of Abraham Lincoln, was born and raised in Lexington.  35 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About LexingtonSource: Mathew Brady via Wikimedia Commons
35. The Pope Villa in Lexington is one of the best surviving domestic designs by architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe, who designed the United States Capitol building.  What’s your favorite Lexington fun fact? Tell us in the comments below!
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